Risseldy Rosseldy

 

I married my wife in the month of June,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

And carried her off in a silver spoon,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

Refrain:   Risselty, rosselty, hey bombassity,

                Nickety, nackety, retrical quality,

                Willoby, wollaby, mow, mow, mow.

 

She combed her hair but once a year,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

With every rake she shed a tear,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

She churned the butter in Dad’s old boot,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

And for a dasher, she used her foot,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

The butter came out a grizzly gray,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

The cheese took legs and ran away,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

She swept the floor but once a year,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

And for a broom she used a chair,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

She played her guitar but once a year,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

And for a pick she used her ear.

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

She kept her shoes on the pantry shelf,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

If you want any more you can sing it yourself,

Risseldy, rosseldy, mow, mow, mow.

 

Risseldy Rosseldy is a vague survival of the ancient ballad “A Wife Wrapped in Wethers Skin.”  The next to last verse was written by Alexander Conn in Third Grade.